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‘Nurture fresh thinking for a healthy world’

SHS Garden Journal Blog

2017 Charity Golf Day

Saturday, October 14, 2017

2017 Charity Golf Day


Thank you for your generous support in making our day a success!


A big shout out from the Seed Harvest Spoon Team to all those who participated as sponsors, players or guests at our second annual Charity Golf Day Friday 8th Sept. 

The weather was wonderful, the golf was great and a whole lot of fun was had by players of all ability and spectators alike! 

We are so pleased to announce we raised over $15,000.  The generosity of everyone through buying raffle tickets, auction items or pledging funds will not go unnoticed. Now we are able to help create a Native garden and yarning circle at Riverwood PS, and buy basic gardening equipment and a year’s supply of plants for the schools we are working with.

As well, these funds enable us to continue to employ dedicated Educators. These amazing teachers will keep planning and delivering awesome lessons with kids in the school gardens. That’s where we know we make a measurable difference – from helping the children prepare gardens, plant seedlings and get excited about eating vegetables – to watching and just enjoying learning and being in an outdoor classroom.

The day was made possible with the awesome support from the following sponsors:






Funding News

Tuesday, July 12, 2016

As a Not-for-Profit organisation Seed Harvest Spoon is dedicated to providing our clients a professional, high quality face-to-face education service. We believe in the power of grassroots education in supporting communities to thrive and work together for enhanced health and wellbeing. We are very grateful for the support given to us by our sponsors and funding partners. This recognition enables us to continue the valued work we do within communities. We delight in being able to observe the positive difference working alongside children and their family members make to feeling a sense of belonging and value as citizens in caring for earth and people health. 

Recently we have received the following funding to improve the service and projects we deliver to communities:

Lantern Club, Roselands - upgrade to Riverwood Public School garden - education in food security, healthy eating, food literacy and cooking.

City of Canada Bay - website upgrade (mobile responsive & Eco Store) - you can now have access to our website across all mobile devices and purchase some of our favourite resources through our Eco Store - take a look here.

Canada Bay Club - website upgrade (members area) - due to go live January 2017, further details will be announced later this year - watch this space. 

City of Canada Bay - Research & development of our Community Food Program - soon to be released.

Visit Our Partners page here to view all of our Funding Partners and Collaborators.

For regular up to date information on our projects, please follow us on Facebook.

 

 

School Garden Funding Partnership - Three Schools Three Years

Monday, November 30, 2015

Melrose Park Public School’s community garden project given three years’ support by PAYCE


Melrose Park Public School is the third Sydney school to benefit from a multi-school three-year environmental education program being conducted by the Seed Harvest Spoon Education Foundation and funded by corporate sponsor, PAYCE.

The $200,000 Schools Program now covers support for three school community gardens in outer metropolitan Sydney, including two in the Parramatta region. The other schools are Telopea Public School and Riverwood Public School.

Under a partnership agreement with PAYCE and the schools, Seed Harvest Spoon will deliver weekly free workshops and tutorials over the next three years commencing first term in January. PAYCE has also provided funds to assist the schools to complete their 2015 programs of environmental learning.

The partnership is worth $52,000 to Melrose Park Public School, made up of $48,000 of three years’ support plus $4,000 to complete activities at the school in 2015 final term. In addition, PAYCE has provided a further $48,000 to Seed Harvest Spoon Education Foundation to cover the organisation’s development and operations.

Seed Harvest Spoon, a not-for-profit organisation based in Sydney’s Inner West, specialises in early childhood and primary school environmental education. Leading Australian property investment and development group, PAYCE, has been a strong supporter of environmental education and food gardening programs in schools and communities for several years.

Seed Harvest Spoon workshops and tutorials are delivered by highly skilled professionals adopting a whole-of-community approach. Teachers, parents and carers are encouraged to participate in the lessons alongside the students to increase knowledge, community involvement and interest to join events such as working bees and harvest days.

The partnership with Melrose Park Public School was announced today by Parramatta MP Geoff Lee and PAYCE General Manager, Dominic Sullivan during a visit to the school and inspection of its garden.

Dr Lee said the generous funding gesture by PAYCE would allow the school to enhance and expand its garden activities and strengthen its relationship with the local community.

“The garden has been a fantastic success for the school community over the last couple of years and the broader community have got right behind it through working bees and the volunteers program,” he said.

“The other good news is that the students are becoming better informed about growing food and biodiversity and, in turn, are encouraged to eat more fruit and vegetables, which in turn leads to healthy lifestyles.”

Mr Sullivan said PAYCE was thrilled to offer the long term environmental education program to Melrose Park Public School in partnership with Seed Harvest Spoon.

“We see any program that promotes the development of healthy local communities through personal health and wellbeing, strong and connected communities and a healthier environment as being most worthy of support,” he said.

“The program also promotes active community engagement through working bees, school incursions, local volunteering and community events in the garden itself.”

Mr Sullivan explained that the sponsorship with Seed Harvest Spoon was an extension of a relationship built up in recent years with Riverwood Public School and the local community, where community gardens at the school and Washington Park are flourishing.

“We’ve seen the benefits that flow from the hands-on, practical nature of this type of program, with pupils learning the importance of teamwork and developing self-confidence and the value of involving the community,” he said.

PAYCE Managing Director, Brian Boyd said the program showed young children the importance of the natural world and how healthy eating choices contributed to a healthy and long life.

“Melrose Park Public School has developed a wonderful garden of which they can be justly proud, but need money and other resources to keep it going,” he said.

“In this instance, PAYCE has come to the party with the necessary resources for the school and community to plan well into the future and continue with its development.

“With Seed Harvest Spoon on board, the school’s students and teachers now have the benefit of professional tutorship and mentoring by the very experienced and enthusiastic team,” Boyd said.

Principal Clare Kristensen said the school’s Kitchen Garden plays an important role in the environmental education of students and there was a lot to be gained from the PAYCE sponsored program.

“The garden is also used in relation to other activities such as digital photography, films and art,” she said.

“We are very grateful to PAYCE and their team for their corporate support and we look forward to a great relationship with them and the Seed Harvest Spoon team.”

Michelle Carrick, Seed Harvest Spoon’s Program Director said her organisation would deliver a staged program to the schools over the next three years.

“My colleagues and I are very excited to be able to continue the learning program we have just started at Melrose Park and one of the first steps in the New Year will be strengthening the volunteer and training programs,” she said.

“The final stage further down the track will involve empowering communities to lead the sustainability practices in their established gardens and will also include neighbouring schools participation through incursions and additional programs.”

About PAYCE

PAYCE is a public listed Australian company with a proven track record in creating exceptional new communities.

Founded in 1978, PAYCE is a recognised leader in innovative urban renewal, and has won a reputation for transforming places through its integrated residential, retail and commercial developments.

PAYCE has won numerous industry awards for its projects, including Development of the Year at the Urban Taskforce’s 2015 Awards and Best Retail and Commercial development in NSW and ACT at the 2015 Urban Development Institute of Australia’s Awards of Excellence and most recently best Retail development in Australia in the national Interior Design Excellence Awards. PAYCE is currently delivering an exciting new urban development, Royal Shores, and community amenities beside the Parramatta River at Ermington in partnership with Sekisui House Australia.

PAYCE is firmly committed to social equity. For many years, PAYCE has helped to provide support to those in society disadvantaged by circumstances. Working alongside respected not-for-profit organisations and groups, PAYCE supports the good work and services being delivered, and helps provide resources needed by these bodies in progressing towards hopeful futures and social harmony for those in need.

In addition to supporting the Seed Harvest Spoon Schools Program at a number of locations, PAYCE is currently working in partnership with the Salvation Army, St Vincent de Paul, Matthew Talbot Hostel, Adele, St Merkarious Charity and Windgap. PAYCE also recently formed a Foundation Partnership with the Sydney Street Choir to support the choir financially and corporately over the next three years.


 



Community Recipe Share

Wednesday, November 25, 2015

Fried Potato Cake (called Imomochi in Japan) - Kenshin

Ingredients
3 Peeled Potatoes (around 500g)
2 Tbs Potato starch
Rice Bran oil 
*25ml Soy Sauce
*50g Sugar
*25ml Mirin (Sweet cooking sauce)
*1 Tbs potato starch
*3 Tbs water

Instruction

  1. Cut the potatoes to 1/4 size.
  2. Steam the potatoes until all soft even inside.
  3. During steaming mix the *marked ingredients together will in the saucepan and heat them with whisking well until thickened.
  4. Put the steamed potatoes into a bowl and mash them until smooth.
  5. Put 2Tbs potato start into the bowl and mix with mashed potatoes well until the potato starch powder has disappeared.
  6. Take some mashed potato with your hand to build a palm sized flat round shape for all mashed potato.
  7. Put pan-button-covered amount of oil on the frying pan and preheat the pan with high heat.
  8. After the pan is heated well, fry the potato cakes on the pan.
  9. Fry them until the both surface have been a bit brown.
  10. Put fried potato cakes on the plate.
  11. Pour the sauce over the fried potato cakes and serve them.



Watch this space.....New Community Recipes from our Food Stories Program will be added in the next few days...August 2017

Heart of a School Garden: Friendship, Food & Community Wellbeing

Wednesday, November 25, 2015

We are often asked, ‘What’s the best thing about your job?’ For us top on the list is the diversity of people we meet and how these acquaintances or relationships enrich our opportunity for learning and zest for teaching. Whether it’s a conversation with a young child, student, a teacher or community member each interaction provides an insight to our work purpose

Asiye & Zorka Riverwood Community Garden

                                              Asiye & Zorka - Riverwood Community Garden 2015

We wanted to share with you the story of Zorka and Asiye, who are the best of friends. Together they radiate the heart and soul of Riverwood Public School garden. They support the garden to grow and flourish through their hard work, presence and commitment to creating a safe environment for the children to learn and belong. They no longer have children at the school, but they tend the garden each week out of authentic interest and wellbeing. For them the garden provides a sense of belonging to their community and heartfelt connection to their homeland. While they have been in Australia for around 40 years their cultural backgrounds of Macedonian and Turkish along with the 17 different cultures represented at the school embeds a deep character. 

What do you love most about coming to the garden? 

Zorka - My daughter was grown up, and I got lonely. I think I can sit here watch TV all day and get to be a bigger person than I am! This is my hobby. Being in the school garden reminds me of when my daughter was at school, and it is important the children know where food comes from. My daughter used to ask questions like ‘Does a watermelon grow on a tree?’ and I think the kids might be the same. It’s very important that they know where the food comes from, not just the shops. Watching the lifecycle of plants growing from seeds, to the table, makes my heart bigger. When I see the plants, I am jumping for joy! 

Asiye - This is my community. I like to watch the changes of the vegetables growing. I like to be busy. 

What changes have you seen over the time you have been here? 

This garden was empty, dry land before the garden. Hard work has made the difference to what is here today. 

What are your hopes for the garden? 

Zorka - For the future, the soil is still dry, it needs to be better, and that the garden is still looking as beautiful. 

What do you gain from the garden? 

It is joyful to see the plants growing, to see the students coming and eating, sharing the food; they pick it themselves and eat it here in the garden. 

Zorka and Asiye are the garden guardians, earth stewards and food producers. These two ladies have enriched our learning in the 3 years we have known them through our shared interest in growing food and nurturing a sense of place. Learning for us is about respect and creating opportunities for people to grow together. Creating communities of practice is essential to this social learning relationship. Learning evolves through shared stories, regular interaction, conversation, and openness where everyone feels valued for their contribution. Both ladies work in collaboration with the students to create a haven and special outdoor learning space representing the heart of the school. 

Zorka and Asiye delight in the knowledge that they are making a difference to their community, they do this to instil a community sense of pride. Harvest days in the school garden are a special community occasion; on these days Zorka and Asiye can be found in the garden hours beforehand preparing for the afternoon. During a big day of work they will stop for lunch by setting up their outdoor table and chairs with a simple spread of food where they both share a meal, conversation, laughter and stories with each other. They love this and it reminds them of how food was shared and celebrated in their respective home villages.

Volunteering their time to the school garden is only part of their commitment to community. They also volunteer to keep the streets of their community clean through the Community Clean Street Program an initiative organised by the Riverwood Community Centre, where citizens meet to pick up litter in their neighbourhood to improve their area. Zorka and Asiye are members of the Riverwood Community Garden a beautiful multicultural garden, abundant and thriving with 55 plots. You can sense the strong community connection in Riverwood where everyone works as a team to support cohesion and pride. Whether we are working towards a healthy environment, sustainability, food security or community health and wellbeing it is visible that difference is achievable at this grassroots level. 

Permaculture Principle 8: Integrate rather that segregate
Our goal for a strong community is to work as a team supporting each other to grow. Learning is collaborative based on a commitment to our purpose. Decisions are thoughtful and reflect the ethics of Permaculture: earth care, people care and fair share. We embrace the diversity of this community and love to hear stories of how food is the centre of cultural celebrations. Growing food brings us together, it unites across cultures as a common staple while valued as a highly prized gift when grown and shared amongst community. While the garden can bring us an abundance of healthy food, the garden offers community a sense of harmony and an authentic relationship with the earth and people around us. Identify your own community champions, nurture these relationships and delight in the pleasure of watching your garden grow together. Successful relationships in the school garden will help plants grow stronger and the produce taste better! 

For more information about Permaculture ethics and principles visit: http://www.permacultureprinciples.com/

Author: Michelle Carrick 
Seed Harvest Spoon Co-Founder & Program Director 
Copyright 2015: Seed Harvest Spoon Education Foundation Ltd.


Telopea Public School's community garden set to thrive from corporate funding

Tuesday, September 22, 2015

Telopea Public School’s community garden will benefit from a three-year funding partnership announced today (September 18) between Seed Harvest Spoon Education Foundation and principal corporate sponsor, PAYCE.

Seed Harvest Spoon will deliver an expanded program free of charge to Telopea Public School for three years commencing from January 2016. PAYCE will also provide additional funds to assist the school to complete this year’s program of learning.

The partnership is worth $52,000 to Telopea Public School, made up of $48,000 for three years’ support plus $4,000 to complete activities at the school in the final term this year. In addition, PAYCE has pledged a further $48,000 to Seed Harvest Spoon Education Foundation over the same period to cover the organisation’s development and operations.

Seed Harvest Spoon, a not-for-profit organisation based in Sydney’s inner west, specialises in early childhood and primary school environmental education. Leading Australian property investment company, PAYCE, has been a strong supporter of the environmental education and food gardening program for several years.

Seed Harvest Spoon workshops are delivered to schools by highly skilled professionals adopting a whole-of-community approach. Teachers, parents and carers are encouraged to participate in the lessons alongside the students to increase knowledge development, community involvement and interest to join events such as, working bees and harvest days. 

The funding partnership was announced today (September 18) by Parramatta MP Geoff Lee and PAYCE General Manager, Dominic Sullivan during a visit to the school. Also attending were Michelle Carrick and Natalie Er from Seed Harvest Spoon, school Principal, Alan McGowen and school captains, Kathleen Birrell and Antwone Robertson.

Mr Lee congratulated PAYCE for its generous gesture in providing the funding for the next three years to allow the school to further develop the range of activities associated with the school community garden.

“The garden has been an outstanding success for both the school community and the broader community, who are very supportive and have become involved through working bees and the volunteer program,” he said.

“One of the most important outcomes from the Seed Harvest Spoon program is that the students learn about growing food and sustainability and are encouraged to eat more fruit and vegetables, which in turn leads to healthy eating and lifestyles.”

Mr Sullivan said PAYCE was thrilled to join with Seed Harvest Spoon in delivering its environmental education program to Telopea Public School.

“We fully support the program’s aims to facilitate the development of healthy local communities through personal health and wellbeing, strong and connected communities and a healthier environment,” he said.

“In addition to learning about growing food and ecology principles, the program promotes active community engagement through community working bees, school incursions, local volunteering and community events in the garden.

“The sponsorship is an extension of our successful long-term relationship with Riverwood Public School and the local community, where the school community garden is now flourishing in its fifth year.

“We have seen first-hand at Riverwood the benefits that flow from the hands-on, practical nature of the program, with pupils learning the importance of teamwork and developing self-confidence and improved self-esteem through their own efforts and achievements in the garden.

PAYCE Managing Director, Brian Boyd said the program was a wonderful way to introduce young children to the natural world and was a catalyst for them leading a healthy life through good nutrition and healthy eating choices.

“Telopea Public School has developed a wonderful productive garden through the efforts and enthusiasm of the students and the help of school community and PAYCE is pleased to come on board to keep that momentum going,” he said.

“The funding will allow the school and its teachers to continue to build on the good work to date under the tutorship and mentoring of the very experienced and enthusiastic team from Seed Harvest Spoon.”

Michelle Carrick, Seed Harvest Spoon’s Program Director said the long- term funding from PAYCE was most welcomed and will allow the organisation to grow its current one-year program to a program covering three years.

“We are excited to be able to continue the learning program we have started here with the students and teachers at Telopea Public School. Our vision is to extend the program’s reach to implement and strengthen community volunteer programs and training,” she said.

“The final stage will involve empowering communities to lead the sustainability practices in their established gardens and will also include neighbouring schools participation through incursions and additional programs.”

About PAYCE

PAYCE is a public listed Australian company with a proven track record in creating exceptional new communities.

Founded in 1978, PAYCE is a recognised leader in innovative urban renewal, and has won a reputation for transforming places through its integrated residential, retail and commercial developments.

PAYCE has won numerous industry awards for its projects, including Development of the Year at the Urban Taskforce’s 2015 Awards and Best Retail and Commercial development in NSW and ACT at the 2015 Urban Development Institute of Australia’s Awards of Excellence. PAYCE is currently delivering an exciting new urban development, Royal Shores, beside the Parramatta River at Ermington in partnership with Sekisui House Australia.

PAYCE is firmly committed to social equity. For many years, PAYCE has helped to provide support to those in society disadvantaged by circumstances.

PAYCE’s policy is to work alongside respected not-for-profit organisations and groups in supporting the good works being delivered, and to help provide resources needed by these bodies in progressing towards hopeful futures and social harmony for those in need.

In addition to supporting the Seed Harvest Spoon Schools Program at a number of locations, other organisations and bodies that PAYCE is currently working with include the Salvation Army, St Vincent de Paul, Matthew Talbot Hostel, Adele, St Merkarious Charity and Windgap. PAYCE also recently formed a Foundation Partnership with the Sydney Street Choir to support the choir financially and corporately over the next three years.



                                            

Using the Early Years Learning Framework Outcomes to Support Sustainability

Friday, April 11, 2014


Each day in Child Care Services opportunities for introducing Sustainability are available. Concepts that support The Early Years Learning Framework and My Time Our Place outcomes may be overlooked. By thinking about our own practice and being thoughtful of the lens' we use to do so, we can provide both the children that we work with and ourselves an opportunity to learn about our local community and the world we live in. 

The Early Years Learning Framework and My Time Our Place are measured against 5 key learning outcomes:



Learning Outcome 1: By talking about feelings when discussing our precious
fresh water supply and discussing strategies that the children may be involved in,
discuss the need to be aware of our own Environmental Footprint. Children learn to interact with care, empathy and respect. Children have a strong sense of identity.

Learning Outcome 2:
 Involve children in waste management and allow them to be involved in solutions about were their rubbish goes. This could be through simply separating waste into different bins labelled with pictures, or establishing a Worm Farm or Compost Bin. Discuss the different types of resources the children enjoy working with and if they can be sourced locally. Children become socially responsible and show respect for their environment. Children are connected with and contribute to their world. 

Learning Outcome 3: Going on local Community walks and identifying birds
and plant life gives children an understanding of their local community and who
they share it with. Discussion about healthy eating can be supported by growing
favourite vegetables such as carrots or peas. The story of the "Enormous
Turnip" could be acted out. Children have a strong sense of wellbeing.

Learning Outcome 4:
 Recognise that when children jump in to a puddle they are
engaging in an investigation. Build on a child's interest in their local community
and environment. Educators can build on children's inquisitiveness by
introducing both natural and recycled materials to encourage questions and
hypothesising. Children are confident and involved learners.

Learning Outcome 5:
 Introduce the seasons to children explaining the
changes each season brings, and grow seasonal vegetables. Expanding
on this to encourage discussion and terms to represent what is occurring, like asking
"Where does a cloud come from?", could provide a discussion about precipitation
and condensation. Even very young children can be involved with songs and
stories about rain and water. "Tiddalick" is a great story to support this concept.
Introduce and use resources that are recycled such as boxes or containers as
props for children to use, explaining to them how important it is for all of us to
recycle and not over-consume the natural resources of our community. Children
are effective communicators.


If we consider ways in which sustainable practices can be embedded throughout
the day, our philosophy will reflect this.



References:

  • Commonwealth of Aust. 2009b; Belonging, Being and Becoming, The Early
Years Learning Framework of Australia, Canberra ACT; DEEWR,
http;www.deewr.gov.au/early learning
  • Raban, B, Margetts, K, Church, A, Deans, J, 2010; The Early Years Learning
Framework in Practice; MA Education
  • Vegotsky, L, 1978; Mind and Society: The Development of Higher Mental
Processes MS: Cambridge University Press.

Written by: Sharon Dodd-Gilhooly - SHS Facilitator; March 2014

Copyright Seed Harvest Spoon Education Foundation 


Author Carolyn Nuttall endorses Seed Harvest Spoon

Friday, February 28, 2014

Thank-you Carolyn Nuttall for your endorsement of our work. We very much appreciate your kind words……...

"I much admire the work of the women of Seed Harvest Spoon. This small group of educators have banded together to design and implement very valuable programs in outdoor learning for young children.

Schools can take advantage of this deal: quality teaching, programs connected to the curriculum, sustainability education at a budget price. Their programs will inspire the child's interest in the natural world, skill them in areas of waste recycling, teach them about soil and growing food and more….

For the children, they will feel part of the solution, a concept introduced by Bill Mollison and aptly applied to the young. "Permaculture encourages the individual to be resourceful and self-reliant, to become a conscious part of the solution to the many problems that face us, both locally and globally."

I recommend the work of Michelle, Bree and the team of Seed Harvest Spoon to all primary schools and early childhood centres."


Carolyn Nuttall
Author of "A Children's Food Forest " and co-author with Janet Millington of "Outdoor Classrooms: A handbook for school gardens" February 2014

Youth Eco Summit 2013 - Newington Armory, Sydney Olympic Park October 23 & 24

Sunday, November 10, 2013

We had a wonderful experience at the Youth Eco Summit. During the two days we met many students and teachers that are proactively implementing environmental education in their school and community. We facilitated our Healthy Soil, Healthy Life, Healthy Us workshop to students from Year 4 to Year 10. 

Feedback and interest shown by the students and teachers was very positive particularly when we gave them the opportunity to immerse their hands in soil.  

The Youth Eco Summit is a great opportunity for schools to highlight their own ideas and initiatives, sharing and learning together with others. 

In a recent email we received following the Eco Summit, the YES Organising Committee stated highlights and some statistics of the event:

Some highlights were:

  • Attendance and fantastic engagement of Minister Robyn Parker who has since prepared a very complimentary speech on YES for Parliament
  • Live video conference connections with schools and universities in Malaysia, Vanuatu, Alaska and (prior to the event) Germany
  • Student media crews Live Streaming YES to Youtube and hence around the world

Amazing stats are as follows:

  • Approximately 6,600 school students participated in YES 2013.
  • 2519 students onsite over two days (with an additional 300 registered but not attending due to fire affected areas)
  • 76 schools onsite over two days
  • 153 schools participating in total, inclusive of video conferences
  • 55 program providers including 18 showcasing schools.
  • 4070 participants in Video Conferences up to and at the event. Video conference schools, 77 in total, including from Alaska (2), Germany (6) prior to Yes, Vanuatu (1), Malaysia (11), NT (6), ACT (1).
  • 1093 live hits on the launch life feed on YouTube in order of views: America, Vietnam, Australia, Mexico, Canada, Japan, Saudi Arabia, UK, Philippines, Thailand, India, Russia and Spain.

Author: Michelle Carrick, Program Director, Seed Harvest Spoon

Riverwood Public School Breakfast Club - Media Release

Tuesday, August 13, 2013
This is the Media Release relating to the Breakfast Club Pilot event that we are supporting tomorrow at Riverwood PS......

Media Release - Tuesday 13 August 2013

Riverwood Public School Pilots Student Breakfast Club Program


Local school, Riverwood Public, will be piloting its very own Breakfast Club for its students on Wednesday 14 August, to encourage healthy eating habits.

Teachers at Riverwood recognise that if children start their day hungry, their learning and concentration in class is affected.  Providing breakfast for all students, will provide essential nutrition and ensure that each child will start their day with a full tank of petrol, whilst promoting socialisation and better health & learning outcomes.

Enabling a Breakfast Club rides on the support of organisations such as Red Cross who have donated Weet-bix; Sydney fruit & vegetable providore John Velluti who will be donating fruit; and Seed Harvest Spoon - educators of healthy life skills, sustainability and growing food gardens, who will coordinate Breakfast Club activities.

Property developers Payce, responsible for the Riverwood North Renewal Project and renowned for developing dynamic and cohesive communities in and around their developments, have generously funded the running of Seed Harvest Spoon’s School Food Garden Programs (www.seedharvestspoon.com.au) at Riverwood Public School during 2013.  This program has provided the platform for the Breakfast Club to be built upon.

It is hoped and anticipated that all of the Riverwood Public School Community – students, parents and carers, will support this wonderful initiative by attending this pilot Breakfast event. Not only will the attendance of responsible adults demonstrate to the children that breakfast is considered an important part of the day, but it will also determine the viability of a weekly breakfast club for the school.

Daniela Frasca, Principal of Riverwood Public School says, "We hope to engage our students and our community members in this wonderful initiative and aim to encourage better eating habits that will impact on our students learning in the classroom, and in the future."

For more information contact:

Daniela Frasca, Principal - Riverwood Public School

Tel: 9153 8757

Email: riverwood-p.school@det.nsw.edu.au